What a beautiful summer I am having. #bestfriends #camping #wolfpack2014

What a beautiful summer I am having. #bestfriends #camping #wolfpack2014

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(Source: bruitist)

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jenmundy:

Sailor Jupiter for Chelsey Holeman’s Sailor Moon 50 Twitter Collab!  Jupiter and Mars were always my favorites growing up.  I couldn’t decide whether I wanted to draw her in street clothes or her senshi uniform, so I did both!  Threw some transparent .pngs in for your dragging enjoyment. ;)

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countdowntoinfinitecrisis:

janinekspendlove:

nerdsrocket:

lemonistas:

I saw this before and IT GOT BETTER.

I need one.

This is pretty much the best thing ever.

Usually I don’t reblog long posts but I live 2 minutes away from this house and one year for april fools day they put a “For Sale” sign in front of it and everyone freaked the fuck out

(Source: iraffiruse)

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I saw a shooting star last night; I made a wish that you would be happy, wherever you are.

T.B. LaBerge // Unwritten Letters to You  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: tblaberge)

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nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Amazing, amazing, amazing!!!

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Sailor Moon - the reason I began to draw.

Sailor Moon - the reason I began to draw.

(Source: crystalapocalypse-inactive)

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pomegranateandivy:

truebluemeandyou:

16 Foods That Regrow Themselves Infographic from Cooking Stoned.

Reblogging again because I love this

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Jesus had a lot of issue with powerful people using power over the powerless.

Clergy protest Supreme Court by handing out condoms at Hobby Lobby. (via think-progress)

Serene Jones, President of Union Theological Seminary in New York City, was quick to blast the ruling, saying, “I am horrified by the thought that the owners of Hobby Lobby as Christians think their corporation has a soul, and I’m even more appalled that the Supreme Court agrees.”

There are a lot of religious people who aren’t jerks and work for the betterment of humanity.

(via turnabout)

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i-love-art:

Olaf Hajek 
Illustrations for the book “the new secret language of the symbols”,Duncan Baird Publishers, London

i-love-art:

Olaf Hajek 

Illustrations for the book “the new secret language of the symbols”,
Duncan Baird Publishers, London

Photo tagged as: reblog - Reblog from i-love-art

The basics are that for every one female-speaking character in family-rated films (G, PG and PG-13), there are roughly three male characters; that crowd and group scenes in these films — live-action and animated — contain only 17 percent female characters; and that the ratio of male-female characters has been exactly the same since 1946. Throw in the hypersexualization of many of the female characters that are there, even in G-rated movies, and their lack of occupations and aspirations and you get the picture.

It wasn’t the lack of female lead characters that first struck me about family films. We all know that’s been the case for ages, and we love when movies like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Frozen hit it big. It was the dearth of female characters in the worlds of the stories — the fact that the fictitious villages and jungles and kingdoms and interplanetary civilizations were nearly bereft of female population — that hit me over the head. This being the case, we are in effect enculturating kids from the very beginning to see women and girls as not taking up half of the space. Couldn’t it be that the percentage of women in leadership positions in many areas of society — Congress, law partners, Fortune 500 board members, military officers, tenured professors and many more — stall out at around 17 percent because that’s the ratio we’ve come to see as the norm?

OK, now for the fun part: It’s easy, fast and fun to add female characters, in two simple steps. And I want to be clear I’m not talking about creating more movies with a female lead. If you do, God bless and thank you. Please consider me for that role.

Step 1: Go through the projects you’re already working on and change a bunch of the characters’ first names to women’s names. With one stroke you’ve created some colorful unstereotypical female characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they’ve had a gender switch. What if the plumber or pilot or construction foreman is a woman? What if the taxi driver or the scheming politician is a woman? What if both police officers that arrive on the scene are women — and it’s not a big deal?

Step 2: When describing a crowd scene, write in the script, “A crowd gathers, which is half female.” That may seem weird, but I promise you, somehow or other on the set that day the crowd will turn out to be 17 percent female otherwise. Maybe first ADs think women don’t gather, I don’t know.

And there you have it. You have just quickly and easily boosted the female presence in your project without changing a line of dialogue.

Yes, we can and will work to tell more women’s stories, listen to more women’s voices and write richer female characters and to fix the 5-to-1 ratio of men/women behind the camera. But consider this: In all of the sectors of society that still have a huge gender disparity, how long will it take to correct that? You can’t snap your fingers and suddenly half of Congress is women. But there’s one category where the underrepresentation of women can be fixed tomorrow: onscreen. In the time it takes to make a movie or create a television show, we can change what the future looks like.

There are woefully few women CEOs in the world, but there can be lots of them in films. We haven’t had a woman president yet, but we have on TV. (Full disclosure: One of them was me.) How can we fix the problem of corporate boards being so unequal without quotas? Well, they can be half women instantly, onscreen. How do we encourage a lot more girls to pursue science, technology and engineering careers? By casting droves of women in STEM jobs today in movies and on TV. Hey, it would take me many years to become a real nuclear physicist, but I can play one tomorrow.

Here’s what I always say: If they can see it, they can be it.

Geena Davis on gender equality in film and television [x] (via wesleywalesandersons)

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audreyhellburn:

republicans

(Source: outofcontextarthur)

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(Source: aint-got-nothin-at-all)

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justinacuff:

h/t Raise the Minimum Wage Facebook Page

justinacuff:

h/t Raise the Minimum Wage Facebook Page

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fuck-yeah-feminist:

whiskersonkittens:

Things that don’t make you less of a feminist:

  • Being in a loving relationship.
  • BDSM.
  • Being submissive.
  • Wearing makeup.
  • Being a housewife.
  • Wearing dresses.
  • High heels.
  • Shaving.


Things that do make you less of a feminist:

  • Shaming women for doing any of these things.

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(Source: dead-lovers-sarabande)

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